Acoustic neuroma surgery (vestibular schwannoma)

Acoustic neuromas or vestibular schwannomas are rare noncancerous tumor, which typically presents with hearing loss, dizziness and tinnitus. When indicated, the most advanced surgical techniques are available at the National Brain Aneurysm & Tumor Center.


Aneurysm clipping

The traditional surgical method for repairing an aneurysm in which the neurosurgeon exposes the aneurysm and then places a metal clip that opens and closes like a clothespin across the base of the aneurysm so no more blood can enter the aneurysm.


Brain bypass surgery (EC-IC bypass surgery)

In rare cases when an aneurysm cannot be clipped or coiled, the neurosurgeon may have to perform a brain bypass surgery. This surgery brings blood flow through a new channel beyond the aneurysm and then traps the segment of the artery with the aneurysm between clips. Eric Nussbaum, MD, has performed more than 400 brain bypass procedures in which tiny blood vessels are connected surgically to reroute blood flow around blocked or diseased arteries deep within the brain.


Brain tumor surgery

The National Brain Aneurysm & Tumor Center has particular expertise in the management of the most complex tumors that either involve the skull base or that are located deep within the brain itself. A multi-disciplinary team brings together practitioner from a wide variety of fields, combining the join efforts of skull base neurosurgery, neuro-otology (ENT), neuro-ophthalmology, craniofacial reconstructive/plastic surgery, CyberKnife neuroradiosurgery, neuropathology and neuro-oncology to optimize patient options and outcomes. Regular multidisciplinary brain bumor conferences allow for open discussion of even the most complex cases.


Carotid artery angioplasty and stenting

The carotid arteries are the main blood vessels that carry blood and oxygen to the brain. Narrowing of the carotid arteries is called carotid artery disease or carotid artery stenosis and is caused by atherosclerosis—or buildup of substances in the inside of the artery lining. Similar to coronary artery disease in the heart, carotid artery disease reduces the flow of blood to the brain. Treatment options may include angioplasty and stenting.


Carotid endarterectomy (CEA)

Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a surgical procedure to open or clean the carotid artery with the goal of stroke prevention.


Cavernous malformation surgery

This surgery may be used if a cavernous malformation is growing or causing problems.


Cerebrovascular neurosurgery

Surgical management of cerebrovascular disorders is coordinated by a multidisciplinary team through the National Brain Aneurysm & Tumor Center. Many of these disorders may be treated successfully with surgery including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformation (AVM), vascular malformations, ischemic disorders and pediatric cerebrovascular disorders. Surgery may eliminate the dangers associated with these disorders including life-threatening hemorrhage.


Complex brain surgery

Our neurosurgeons are highly specialized in the surgical treatment for difficult-to-reach, delicate and deep regions of the brain. At the National Brain Aneurysm & Tumor Center, we have cared for patients from all regions of the United States and from countries across the globe. Our approach and results have garnered recognition from top centers throughout the United States and internationally. Complex cases are referred to us on a regular basis for consideration, particularly those that have failed treatment or been turned down for treatment elsewhere. 


Craniofacial reconstructive surgery

A surgical subspecialty that deals with congenital acquired deformities of the head, skull, face, neck, jaws and associated areas, our focused, multi-disciplinary team approach brings decades of experience to these complicated cases. Patients have traveled from all regions of the globe for surgical treatment for craniofacial reconstructive care.


Craniofacial skull base surgery

A multidisciplinary team approach is used in craniofacial skull base surgery—one of the most difficult and complex types of surgery performed today.


CyberKnife

The latest CyberKnife technology is offered at the Nasseff CyberKnife Center, allowing a tem to offer the latest technology, including frameless and painless treatment for some of the most complicated cases of both benign and malignant tumors as well as vascular malformations. Leslie A. Nussbaum, MD, PhD, is the only neurosurgeon in the Twin Cities with a dedicated subspecialty of radiosurgery. Dr. Leslie Nussbaum is co-director of the John Nasseff CyberKnife Center at United Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota. She sees patients at the National Brain Aneurysm & Tumor Center clinic locations in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Her practice focuses on CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery for complex brain and spinal disorders, including benign and malignant brain tumors, metastatic tumors and vascular malformations.


EC – IC bypass surgery (brain bypass surgery)

In rare cases when an aneurysm cannot be clipped or coiled, the neurosurgeon may have to perform a brain bypass surgery. This surgery brings blood flow through a new channel beyond the aneurysm and then traps the segment of the artery with the aneurysm between clips. Eric Nussbaum, MD, has performed more than 400 brain bypass procedures in which tiny blood vessels are connected surgically to reroute blood flow around blocked or diseased arteries deep within the brain.


Embolization

A technique that may be used as part of the treatment of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). As an extension of an angiogram, a catheter is passed up into the arteries inside the brain, and the arteries supplying blood flow to the AVM are then blocked off from the inside with either glue or metal coils or a variety of substances. This is often performed as a prelude to surgery, but occasionally, may be curative without additional therapy.


Gamma knife

A device that is used to deliver high-dose, focused beam radiation for the treatment of AVMs (and also tumors) of the brain. This is one of two commonly used ways to perform radiosurgery.


Glomus tumor surgery

Surgery to remove the benign, highly vascular tumors (also called paragangliomas) located in the head and neck.


Hemangioblastoma surgery

is performed to treat these benign, highly vascular tumors in the brain.


Intracerebral hemorrhage repair

Treatment for a type of stroke in which an artery in the brain bursts, which causes extremely dangerous bleeding.


Meningioma surgery

Surgical treatment options vary for this type of tumor that develops in one of the protective layers around the brain and spinal cord.


Metastatic brain tumor surgery

Also referred to as secondary brain tumors, metastatic brain tumors are caused by cancer cells spreading to the brain from another part of the body.


Nasal carcinoma surgery

This surgery may be performed to treat the many types of cancer that grow in the sinuses and can spread to other parts of the body.


Neurovascular surgery

At the National Brain Aneurysm & Tumor Center, we provide highly subspecialized care for patients with conditions affecting blood vessels of the brain. We offer the latest surgical techniques, technologies, and conduct clinical and translational research to advance this area of medicine. Components of our multi-disciplinary team include neurovascular surgery, interventional neuroradiology, stroke neurology, neurocritical care and neuro-radiosurgery (CyberKnife Robotic System). As a result, we offer our patients a complete spectrum of care options and a balanced, thoughtful approach for individuals with brain aneurysms, vascular malformations, stroke and occlusive cerebrovascular disease.


Orbital apex tumor surgery

Orbital apex tumors may compress the optical nerve. Surgery for removal of orbital tumors is complex and requires a multi-disciplinary team approach by an experienced neurosurgeon and neuro-ophthalmology experts. Eric Nussbaum, MD, has significant experience with these complex surgeries and partners with the practitioners from other specialties to ensure the best outcomes for patients. Reconstruction may be required as part of this type of surgery.


Orbital tumor surgery

Orbital tumors are located in the orbit—the bony socket in front of the skull containing the eye. This delicate, complex surgery is performed with the goals of preserving the eye and vision, preventing a malignant tumor from spreading and restoring the patient’s health. Reconstruction may be required as part of this type of surgery.


Pediatric neurovascular surgery

We have performed pediatric neurovascular surgeries to treat pediatric vascular anomalies ranging from hemangiomas to arterial malformations and venous malformations.


Pineal region tumor surgery

Pineal region tumor surgery, or resection, is performed to remove a rare tumor located in the pineal gland—a small organ located near the top of the brainstem and the base of the brain. The pineal gland produces hormones in the body including melatonin.


Pituitary adenoma surgery

Pituitary adenomas are benign and arise from the cells in the pituitary gland based at the base of the brain. The main treatment is a surgery called transsphenoidal surgery—which is done through an area called the sphenoid sinus.


Radiosurgery

The use of high-dose, focused beam radiation for the treatment of AVMs. This technique doesn’t involve open surgery, but is a specialized technique for targeting the AVM for irradiation while sparing the surrounding brain using computer guidance.


Skull base surgery

Skull base surgery is one of the most complex neurosurgeries to perform. The skull base is the region at the floor of the cranial cavity and includes the anterior, middle and posterior compartments. Skull base disorders include a wide variety of tumors, aneurysms, craniopharyngiomas, pituitary tumors and acoustic neuromas/vestibular schwannomas. Eric Nussbaum, MD, is the director of Neurovascular Neurosurgery and the Skull Base Program at United Hospital.


Spinal tumor surgery

Spinal tumors are abnormal masses of tissue within or surrounding the spinal cord or column. These tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Indications for surgery vary depending on the type and location of the spinal tumor.


Stereotactic radiosurgery

Also called radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery is a type of external radiation therapy that uses special equipment to position the patient and precisely delivery focused radiation to treat tumors and other abnormal growths. This treatment uses higher doses, but typically fewer treatment sessions, and has the benefit of delivering radiation to targeted areas with minimal exposure to the healthy surrounding tissue. Leslie A. Nussbaum, MD, PhD, is the only neurosurgeon in the Twin Cities with a dedicated subspecialty of radiosurgery.


Vascular malformation surgery

This surgery is used to repair an abnormality in the development of the blood vessels within the brain resulting in an abnormal collection or pattern of blood vessels in the brain.


Vascular pediatric neurosurgery

National Brain Aneurysm & Tumor Center surgeons perform vascular pediatric neurosurgeries at Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minn.